POTUS Is Considering ‘Full Pardon’ For First Black Heavyweight Champion Jack Johnson

On Saturday, President Trump said that he is considering a “full pardon” for boxing’s first black heavyweight champion, Jack Johnson, after he’s being called by Hollywood actor Sylvester Stallone.

Trump said that Stallone had called him and told him about Johnson, and that he is now considering a posthumous pardon.

On Twitter, Trump wrote: “Sylvester Stallone called me with the story of heavyweight boxing champion Jack Johnson. His trials and tribulations were great, his life complex and controversial. Others have looked at this over the years, most thought it would be done, but yes, I am considering a Full Pardon!”

For the record, former president Barack Obama could have pardoned him but didn’t. At that time, he was too busy pardoning the transgender traitor Chelsea Manning.

More than a century later, Johnson’s relatives asked Obama to pardon the champion, but the Justice Department declined, noting on its website that the general policy was not to accept applications for posthumous pardons for people convicted of federal crimes.

“Mr. Johnson’s conviction was motivated by nothing more than the color of his skin,” Sen. John McCain of Arizona and Rep. Peter King of New York wrote in a letter to Obama in 2009. “As such, it not only injured his family, but also our nation as a whole.”

Luckily, President Trump cares truly about the American people.

Now America has the greatest president that will ever have! We have a clear picture now, that electing Donald Trump was a good choice. America is transforming to be greater from the very beginning of his presidency. I’m certain Johnson’s family members would really appreciate the pardon, even if it comes many years after his life and death.

What do you think of Trump’s decision about pardoning Jack Johnson?

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Natalie Dagenhardt

Natalie Dagenhardt is an American conservative writer who writes for  Right Journalism! Natalie has described herself as a polemicist who likes to "stir up the pot," and does not "pretend to be impartial or balanced, as broadcasters do," drawing criticism from the left, and sometimes from the right. As a passionate journalist, she works relentlessly to uncover the corruption happening in Washington. She is a "constitutional conservative".