POTUS Scolds Rude Reporter Asking About Rod Rosenstein While South Korean President Was Sitting Next To Him! (VIDEO)

President Trump is definitively the first president to have the courage to teach the crude press some manners when a foreign head of state is in the oval office.

President Trump hosted South Korean President Moon Jae-In at the White House on Tuesday. Speaking to reporters in the Oval Office, Trump said there was a “substantial” chance the summit “may not work out” for June 12, but that a decision would be reached soon.

“We’re moving along. We’ll see what happens,” he said. “If it doesn’t happen, maybe it will happen later.”

However, one reporter decided that it was a good time to ask President Trump an irrelevant question to the circumstances like that.

The reporter asked: “Do you have confidence in Rod Rosenstein?”

The reporter was RUDE as South Korean president is sitting right there. She could ask this at a more appropriate time. However, President Trump had an excellent comeback to this question: “Uh, what’s your next question, please?”

The reporter attempted to repeat her question so Trump replied:

“No, excuse me, I have the President of South Korea here, okay? He doesn’t want to hear these questions,” Trump said.

Excellent job, PRESIDENT TRUMP! A good reporter would know when you have the POTUS and President of South Korea in the same room ahead of a historic peace summit with a nuclearized North Korea you don’t ask about Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.

And when the President says, “Next question” that does not entitle the journalist to shout the same question again. They should pull that journalist’s press pass to make a point that in the future journalists need to be polite and remember that they are not entitled to hector the President in the White House.

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Natalie Dagenhardt

Natalie Dagenhardt is an American conservative writer who writes for  Right Journalism! Natalie has described herself as a polemicist who likes to "stir up the pot," and does not "pretend to be impartial or balanced, as broadcasters do," drawing criticism from the left, and sometimes from the right. As a passionate journalist, she works relentlessly to uncover the corruption happening in Washington. She is a "constitutional conservative".