Photos After The Explosion Reveal That The Bombing Target The AT&T Building In Nashville Is Reinforced NSA Style Building

NSA uses towering, windowless skyscrapers, and fortress-like concrete structures that were built to withstand earthquakes and even nuclear attacks. Thousands of people pass by the buildings each day and rarely give them a second glance because their function is not publicly known. They are an integral part of one of the world’s largest telecommunications networks – and they are also linked to a controversial National Security Agency surveillance program.

Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, New York City, San Francisco, Seattle, and Washington, D.C. In each of these cities, The Intercept has identified an AT&T facility containing networking equipment that transports large quantities of internet traffic across the United States and the world. A body of evidence – including classified NSA documents, public records, and interviews with several former AT&T employees – indicates that the buildings are central to an NSA spying initiative that has for years monitored billions of emails, phone calls, and online chats passing across U.S. territory.

Much has previously been reported about the NSA’s surveillance programs. But few details have been disclosed about the physical infrastructure that enables the spying.

There are many AT&T building across our country that are used by the NSA.

Now investigative journalists across the country used the pictures after the Nashville bombing to prove that the AT&T building that was the target of the bombing is a reinforced NSA style building and that the windows and the vents on the exterior are FAKE.

As the independent citizen journalist Alexander Higgins reported the target of the bombing definitely looks like a reinforced NSA building.

The explosion destroyed the facade revealing a solid brick wall behind them.

Apparent roof damage visible as well.

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The building has a protective facade (fake wall) designed to redirect any explosive force up through channels and out the fake vents.

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Some observations of how hardened this building was.

Here we see the entrance on the right and the service dumpster on the left.
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Inspecting aerial footage (next post) shows the entrance is actually the ‘hole in the wall’ and the brick seen here is ripped off the building.

Here we see the “hole in the wall” next to the circles grate and the long column where the device dumpster was.

Notice the brick is blown off the wall.

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Also, note the solid wall behind the brick and what looked like windows.

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While that damage may look extensive, it’s basically a hole where the entrance was and it’s really nothing compared to the complete devastation across the street.

Notice the double-thick brick columns in the debris.

Also, notice the exposed steel rebar in the third picture.

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New photo of the damage to the building across the street from the AT&T building:

Another question has to be asked.

Why did the Nashville AT&T building required this NFP warning sign:

W=Reacts violently or explosively w/ water
1= Unstable at High temperature makes unstable
3=may explode at high temperature
4=will vaporize or readily burn at normal temperature
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AN interesting NIH search returns zero substances for this combination of properties.

Potential secret chemical? Maybe quantum computing-related? Can only speculate.

We can also speculate if this building is an NSA building but the style of the building definitely resembles the giant skyscrapers that we mentioned!

Natalie Dagenhardt

Natalie Dagenhardt is an American conservative writer who writes for  Right Journalism! Natalie has described herself as a polemicist who likes to "stir up the pot," and does not "pretend to be impartial or balanced, as broadcasters do," drawing criticism from the left, and sometimes from the right. As a passionate journalist, she works relentlessly to uncover the corruption happening in Washington. She is a "constitutional conservative".